redheadedfemme: (books. cats. life is sweet.)
 A few weeks ago, I did something I've never done before.

I walked into my local bookstore and bought not one, not two, but four new hardbacks.

(Believe me when I say I'm notoriously stingy with my dollars, and before this I would wait for the paperbacks or peruse the used section. But I also paid off my mortgage at the beginning of the year, and eight months later, that sunk in to the point where I could actually let myself buy BOOKS.)

Two of these were sequels to books I already own. Two were from authors I'd never heard of, but I'd seen reviews in various places and thought they would be something I'd like. 

All four of them were from the same genre--Young Adult.

Now, this is a new development. I've started making the YA section of my library a regular stop, even though I'm a *cough*few decades*cough* past the target audience. It's actually a rather pitiful little section that could use a major expansion, but it does hold such gems as Andrew Fukuda's fantastic Hunt series. I'm sure I've gotten a few sideways looks from the teenagers sitting up there browsing their Facebook pages, or playing whatever video games are popular nowadays, when I go to dig through the New Arrivals shelves.

Because as far as I can see--and this has been true for a good while--some of the best new fiction being published today is Young Adult.

Maybe The Hunger Games started it all. But the coming-of-age/angst-ridden/high school/sexual-awakening stories (Paul Zindel, Judy Blume et al) I remember aren't there now, not as they used to be. What I see now are dystopias. Tons of them. Along with science fiction and fantasy worlds of all stripes. Vampires, werewolves, and zombies abound (Carrie Ryan's Forest of Hands and Teeth trilogy, for example, hands down the most depressing books I have ever read) along with lesser-known beasties like water horses (Maggie Stiefvater's fantastic The Scorpio Races).

All these books have teenage protagonists (usually female) dealing with life-and-death issues no teenager should ever have to deal with. First kisses, crushes on your best friend's sibling, and the infamous What I Did On My Summer Vacation essay are right out as problems in these kids' lives. 

Instead, you have things like: a souped-up global warming scenario crossed with the Greek pantheon, and discovering you're really Persephone, snatched away from the Underworld, and your mother is the cause of the former; and humanity, decimated by a virus that rebirths a few select teenage "survivors" as intelligent, emotionless, non-decaying killer zombies. 

(These are the plots of two of the books I bought. I'll review them in detail soon.)

I love this kind of stuff. It's right up my alley. I keep adding books to my Amazon Wish List, not necessarily to pick them up second-hand as soon as they come out (I've contributed my fair share of hardback royalties this year, I think), but mostly to keep track of them; it seems like there's another terrific-sounding book being released every day. 

I don't know if I'll ever write Young Adult myself--everybody and their second cousin is doing it nowadays, it seems, which of course means it's in danger of overexposing itself. But even if it is in the middle of a boom-and-bust cycle, and the pendulum is going to swing back soon (as it always does), we're getting some wonderful stories in the meantime. 

Let's enjoy them. 







redheadedfemme: (books. cats. life is sweet.)
 Here is the complete list of books I read last year. 

 

Republican Gomorrah: Inside the Movement That Shattered the Party, Max Blumenthal [library book, non-fiction, politics]

 

Undone Deeds, Mark Del Franco [purchase, fiction, urban fantasy]

 

Shaded Vision, Yasmine Galenorn [purchase, fiction, urban fantasy]

 

I Want My MTV: The Uncensored Story of the Music Video Revolution, Craig Marks and Rob Tannenbaum [library book, non-fiction, music]

 

The Mortal Bone, Marjorie M. Liu [purchase, fiction, urban fantasy]

 

Selected Poems of William Butler Yeats [purchase, poetry]

 

Gabby: A Story of Courage and Hope, Mark Kelly and Gabrielle Giffords [library book, non-fiction, memoir]

 

Fateful, Claudia Gray [purchase, fiction, young adult, werewolves]

 

River Marked, Patricia Briggs [purchase, fiction, urban fantasy]

 

Raven Cursed, Faith Hunter [purchase, fiction, urban fantasy]

 

Soft Apocalypse, Will McIntosh [library book, fiction, science fiction]

 

Life Itself, Roger Ebert [purchase, non-fiction, memoir]

 

The Dead-Tossed Waves, Carrie Ryan [purchase, fiction, young adult, zombie apocalypse]

 

Devil's Punch, Ann Aguirre [purchase, fiction, urban fantasy]

 

 The Worst of Times, Patricia G. Miller [purchase, non-fiction, reproductive rights]

 

Back Rooms: An Oral History of the Illegal Abortion Era, Ellen Messer and Kathryn E. May [purchase, non-fiction, reproductive rights]

 

Partials, Dan Wells [purchase, fiction, young adult, post-apocalyptic]

 

Divergent, Veronica Roth [purchase, fiction, young adult, dystopian]

 

The Immortal Rules, Julie Kagawa [purchase, fiction, young adult, post-apocalyptic]

 

Hounded, Hexed and Hammered, Kevin Hearne [purchases, fiction, urban fantasy]

 

Robopocalypse, Daniel H. Wilson [library book, fiction, science fiction, post-apocalypse]

 

Tricked, Kevin Hearne [purchase, fiction, urban fantasy]

 

Blackout, Mira Grant [purchase, fiction, science fiction, zombie apocalypse]

 

The Dark and Hollow Places [library book, fiction, young adult, zombie apocalypse]

 

Enclave, Ann Aguirre [library book, fiction, young adult, post-apocalyptic]

 

Chime, Franny Billingsley [library book, fiction, young adult]

 

The Fox Effect: How Roger Ailes Turned a Network Into a Propaganda Machine, David Brock et al [library book, non-fiction, politics, media]

 

Deadly Spin, Wendell Potter [purchase, non-fiction, politics, health care]

 

Welcome to Bordertown, Holly Black and Ellen Kushner [library book, fiction, urban fantasy, anthology]

 

Enlightened Sexism: The Seductive Message That Feminism's Work is Done, Susan J. Douglas [library book, non-fiction, feminism]

 

Ghost Story, Jim Butcher [purchase, fiction, urban fantasy]

 

An Edge In My Voice, Harlan Ellison [library book, non-fiction, essays]

 

Legend, Marie Lu [library book, fiction, young adult, dystopia]

 

The Scorpio Races, Maggie Stiefvater [library book, fiction, young adult, fantasy]

 

Endgame, Ann Aguirre [purchase, fiction, science fiction, space opera]

 

Unraveling, Elizabeth Norris [library book, fiction, young adult, science fiction]

 

Crucible of Gold, Naomi Novik [library book, fiction, fantasy]

 

Death at SeaWorld: Shamu and the Dark Side of Killer Whales in Captivity, David Kirby [library book, non-fiction, marine mammals]

 

Cold Fury, T.M. Goeglein [library book, fiction, young adult, thriller]

 

Dust Girl, Sarah Zettel [library book, fiction, young adult, fantasy]

 

Pegasus, Robin McKinley [library book, fiction, young adult, fantasy]

 

Shadow Rising, Yasmine Galenorn [purchase, fiction, urban fantasy]

 

Hunting the Corrigan's Blood, Holly Lisle [purchase, fiction, science fiction, space opera]

 

The Forest of Hands and Teeth, Carrie Ryan [library book, fiction, young adult, zombie apocalypse]

 

Vessel, Sarah Beth Durst [library book, fiction, young adult, Arabian Nights-style fantasy]

 

Brave New Love: 15 Dystopian Tales of Desire, Paula Guran [library book, fiction, young adult, anthology, dystopian]

 

Trapped, Kevin Hearne [purchase, fiction, urban fantasy]

 

Glitch, Heather Anastasiu [library book, fiction, young adult, post-apocalyptic]

 

Total books read this year: 51

 

As you can see, I've read a far more young adult fiction this year than I ever have. But I daresay some of the best books to be found anywhere right now are in the young adult section. Certainly some of the most inventive. The fact that the heroes--or heroines (most of the ones I see are the latter) are only sixteen or seventeen don't interfere with my enjoyment of said books one whit. 

 

Best fiction book of 2012: The Scorpio Races, Maggie Stiefvater. (And there's your prime example. I'll say it again: I love love love this book. The pacing, characters, and world are pitch-perfect.)

 

Best non-fiction book of 2012: Enlightened Sexism: The Seductive Message That Feminism's Work is Done, Susan J. Douglas. (Just as good a read the second time around. The writer examines popular culture through feminism's lens and comes to the inescapable conclusion that we've taken one step forward and two steps back.)

 

Worst book of 2012: Chime, Franny Billingsley. (This actually only counts as half a book. I couldn't even finish it, and that almost never happens.)

 

Weirdest book of 2012: Cold Fury, T.M Goeglein. (Two genres that don't mesh well. At all.) 

 

For 2013, I'm making some adjustments to my book list. I've joined Goodreads, so I will be posting reviews there and linking to them here. (I've challenged myself to read 50 books this year.) Purchase links will still go to Powell's. I also have a board on Pinterest I will be pinning to, for those who want to see covers. 

 

I know this is a bit late, but the first couple of weeks of the year have been taken up with personal matters, as well as going on vacation. Now, I hope, I can get back into the swing of things.

 

Happy reading! 

 

redheadedfemme: (open the door)
"Books are not made for furniture, but there is nothing else that so beautifully furnishes a house."  ~Henry Ward Beecher

I do love me some garage sales.

Today, while driving to the library, I had to take a detour as my usual street was closed off due to the Whiskey Row Off-road Mountain Bike Race. Since I used to drive all over town, delivering medication, I know a lot of shortcuts and side streets that will get me where I want to go. This particular shortcut took me around the back of the Arizona Pioneers' Home, where I realized they were having a rummage sale. I almost drove on past, but saw out of the corner of my eye several tables lined with books, which immediately pulled me up short. The siren call of the cheap printed page is impossible to deny.

When I went up there, I was handed a medium-sized paper bag and told I could fill it up for only a dollar, which I gleefully proceeded to do.

Today's haul:

The Living Bible--Reference Edition. Before this, I had one of those huge, bulky PTL Parallel Editions (Living Bible and King James) which will go immediately into my library donation box.

The Man Who Listens To Horses, Monty Roberts. I seem to remember reading something years ago about some things in this book not being true. A quick Google-fu turned this up. It's a good reminder that nothing ever dies on the Internet.

Twilight, Stephenie Meyer. Yes, I know. But I figure at a cost of approximately ten cents for the trade paperback, I can afford to throw the thing against the wall and stomp it into the floor if I feel like it. Or maybe chapter-blog it if it's especially hilarious. 

CDs: I've Got a Right To Cry, Mandy Barnett. Old-fashioned, twangy, stringy, Patsy Cline-style country. 

Natural Dreams: Amazon Odyssey. It's supposed to be Latin New Age music, but it didn't sound particularly Latino to me. Either way, they still got ripped straight into the computer. I suppose I'm hopelessly old-fashioned in that I insist on keeping the (horrors!) actual physical compact discs, instead of relying on the magical pixels. (I still have a few cassettes, too. Anybody remember those?)

Plus several Westerns, including two Louis L'Amour paperbacks, for my mother. 

Next, I went down to the Big Box Retailer Who Dare Not Speak Its Name, where I found some YA books I've been looking at online for a while. I'm a sucker for dystopian/post-apocalyptic stories, and there seem to be a lot of these in the young-adult genre recently. I picked up Veronica Roth's Divergent, Julie Kagawa's The Immortal Rules and Dan Wells' Partials, which proceeded to blow my book budget for the month to tiny Times New Roman bits.

No matter. Books are my indulgence, my pleasure, my passion, unapologetically so. This is why I keep up my listing on Library Thing--if the house ever burns down, I can and will replace them.  
redheadedfemme: (open the door)
"Books are not made for furniture, but there is nothing else that so beautifully furnishes a house."  ~Henry Ward Beecher

I do love me some garage sales.

Today, while driving to the library, I had to take a detour as my usual street was closed off due to the Whiskey Row Off-road Mountain Bike Race. Since I used to drive all over town, delivering medication, I know a lot of shortcuts and side streets that will get me where I want to go. This particular shortcut took me around the back of the Arizona Pioneers' Home, where I realized they were having a rummage sale. I almost drove on past, but saw out of the corner of my eye several tables lined with books, which immediately pulled me up short. The siren call of the cheap printed page is impossible to deny.

When I went up there, I was handed a medium-sized paper bag and told I could fill it up for only a dollar, which I gleefully proceeded to do.

Today's haul:

The Living Bible--Reference Edition. Before this, I had one of those huge, bulky PTL Parallel Editions (Living Bible and King James) which will go immediately into my library donation box.

The Man Who Listens To Horses, Monty Roberts. I seem to remember reading something years ago about some things in this book not being true. A quick Google-fu turned this up. It's a good reminder that nothing ever dies on the Internet.

Twilight, Stephenie Meyer. Yes, I know. But I figure at a cost of approximately ten cents for the trade paperback, I can afford to throw the thing against the wall and stomp it into the floor if I feel like it. Or maybe chapter-blog it if it's especially hilarious. 

CDs: I've Got a Right To Cry, Mandy Barnett. Old-fashioned, twangy, stringy, Patsy Cline-style country. 

Natural Dreams: Amazon Odyssey. It's supposed to be Latin New Age music, but it didn't sound particularly Latino to me. Either way, they still got ripped straight into the computer. I suppose I'm hopelessly old-fashioned in that I insist on keeping the (horrors!) actual physical compact discs, instead of relying on the magical pixels. (I still have a few cassettes, too. Anybody remember those?)

Plus several Westerns, including two Louis L'Amour paperbacks, for my mother. 

Next, I went down to the Big Box Retailer Who Dare Not Speak Its Name, where I found some YA books I've been looking at online for a while. I'm a sucker for dystopian/post-apocalyptic stories, and there seem to be a lot of these in the young-adult genre recently. I picked up Veronica Roth's Divergent, Julie Kagawa's The Immortal Rules and Dan Wells' Partials, which proceeded to blow my book budget for the month to tiny Times New Roman bits.

No matter. Books are my indulgence, my pleasure, my passion, unapologetically so. This is why I keep up my listing on Library Thing--if the house ever burns down, I can and will replace them.  
redheadedfemme: (Default)
 This book made me cry.

Spoilers )

Buy this book. Read it. I used to think "World War Z" was the definitive zombie story, but "Feed" blows Max Brooks out of the water. 


redheadedfemme: (Default)
 This book made me cry.

Spoilers )

Buy this book. Read it. I used to think "World War Z" was the definitive zombie story, but "Feed" blows Max Brooks out of the water. 


redheadedfemme: (reading--I love my books)
I went book-buying yesterday, and came home with one of those stupid elongated mass-market paperbacks.

I hate those books. They look deformed, and they don't fit in the bookcase. I wouldn't have bought this one at all if it hadn't been the latest book in the Dresden Files, Turn Coat, by Jim Butcher.  

But Jim Butcher is one of my favorite authors, and the Dresden Files is a great series. Mr. Butcher provided one of the best reading experiences I have had in years, during my reading of the seventh Harry Dresden book, Dead Beat

Fans of the series should know exactly where I'm going with this. I took the book into the bathroom (where I get  a lot of my reading done) in the middle of chapter 38...right before Harry reanimates Sue, the 65-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus Rex, and rides her into battle. 

I must have sat there on the commode for a good thirty minutes, chortling out loud at this wonderful plot twist. By the time it occurred to me that I had better get up (two chapters later) I had to pry myself loose from the seat. 

Just blame Jim Butcher for my hemorrhoids, I guess. 
Tags:
redheadedfemme: (reading--I love my books)
I went book-buying yesterday, and came home with one of those stupid elongated mass-market paperbacks.

I hate those books. They look deformed, and they don't fit in the bookcase. I wouldn't have bought this one at all if it hadn't been the latest book in the Dresden Files, Turn Coat, by Jim Butcher.  

But Jim Butcher is one of my favorite authors, and the Dresden Files is a great series. Mr. Butcher provided one of the best reading experiences I have had in years, during my reading of the seventh Harry Dresden book, Dead Beat

Fans of the series should know exactly where I'm going with this. I took the book into the bathroom (where I get  a lot of my reading done) in the middle of chapter 38...right before Harry reanimates Sue, the 65-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus Rex, and rides her into battle. 

I must have sat there on the commode for a good thirty minutes, chortling out loud at this wonderful plot twist. By the time it occurred to me that I had better get up (two chapters later) I had to pry myself loose from the seat. 

Just blame Jim Butcher for my hemorrhoids, I guess. 
Tags:
redheadedfemme: (reading--I love my books)
What Kind of Reader Are You?
Your Result: Dedicated Reader

You are always trying to find the time to get back to your book. You are convinced that the world would be a much better place if only everyone read more.

Obsessive-Compulsive Bookworm
Book Snob
Literate Good Citizen
Fad Reader
Non-Reader
What Kind of Reader Are You?
Create Your Own Quiz


The only strange thing about this quiz was Question #4:

Which set of books have you read ALL of?

1. Bridges of Madison Country, The Da Vinci Code, The Name of the Rose, and at least two Harry Potter books
2. Moby Dick, Huckleberry Finn, Wuthering Heights, Great Expectations, The Great Gatsby
3. War and Peace, Silas Marner, Madame Bovary, The Age of Innocence, To the Lighthouse
4. Carrie, The Stand, and a couple other books in high school that I don't remember.

--Which seems to me to discriminate against "genre" readers, as the fourth choice to answer the question has a kind of "dumb horror reader" patina about it.

Also, I'm sorry to say, some of the aforementioned classics I simply cannot plow through. For instance, "Huckleberry Finn's" dialect drives me nuts, and I must be the only person on this planet who hasn't read a single page of Harry Potter.

Still, I haven't read "Bridges" or "Da Vinci" either, so something must be looking up.
Tags:
redheadedfemme: (reading--I love my books)
What Kind of Reader Are You?
Your Result: Dedicated Reader

You are always trying to find the time to get back to your book. You are convinced that the world would be a much better place if only everyone read more.

Obsessive-Compulsive Bookworm
Book Snob
Literate Good Citizen
Fad Reader
Non-Reader
What Kind of Reader Are You?
Create Your Own Quiz


The only strange thing about this quiz was Question #4:

Which set of books have you read ALL of?

1. Bridges of Madison Country, The Da Vinci Code, The Name of the Rose, and at least two Harry Potter books
2. Moby Dick, Huckleberry Finn, Wuthering Heights, Great Expectations, The Great Gatsby
3. War and Peace, Silas Marner, Madame Bovary, The Age of Innocence, To the Lighthouse
4. Carrie, The Stand, and a couple other books in high school that I don't remember.

--Which seems to me to discriminate against "genre" readers, as the fourth choice to answer the question has a kind of "dumb horror reader" patina about it.

Also, I'm sorry to say, some of the aforementioned classics I simply cannot plow through. For instance, "Huckleberry Finn's" dialect drives me nuts, and I must be the only person on this planet who hasn't read a single page of Harry Potter.

Still, I haven't read "Bridges" or "Da Vinci" either, so something must be looking up.
Tags:
redheadedfemme: (blog material--from <lj user="alt_icons")
Sunday when I went shopping (actually I had to waste a couple of hours while my computer was being worked on) I went into Barnes & Noble and indulged in my favorite pastime--roaming the aisles and buying books. One of those books included this title.




This wasn't the edition I bought, mostly because I couldn't stand the thought of owning the idiotic thing. See how strr--retttch--eddd out it looks, even in this picture? This is what I will call a Stupid Paperback. It's stupid because it's some misguided hybridization of a trade paperback and a mass market, standing at least an inch taller than the latter.

Now, I like trade paperbacks. They're a little more upscale, not quite as regal as Your Royal Highness the Queenly Hardback, nor as common as the mass market that sits and gulps its ale, pretending to speak in the clipped accent of its superiors. Trade paperbacks are like the heir born on the wrong side of the blanket who has an outside chance (if all his/her half siblings kick the bucket) of inheriting the title one day. They're friendly and genteel, and the only thing you have to watch with them is dog-earing the pages.

But stupid paperbacks? Bah. I glanced inside and was immediately disoriented by the longer pages. The rhythm of the typesetting seemed thrown off. This particular Stupid Paperback was pretty thick, and while I don't know exactly how many extra lines that works out to per page, it just made the book seem cumbersome and padded.

So I put it back and wandered into the Bargain section. Yes'm, I'm ashamed to say I haunt the remainder table. On this particular day, I found a hardback edition--make that a signed hardback edition--of the very same book, at a cheaper price than I would have paid for the Stupid Paperback!!

I don't know who on earth came up with the idea of publishing this book in such a format. I have all the previous V.I. Warshawski titles, but I would have passed on this one if I had not found the hardcover. Sara Paretsky ought to beat whoever approved this over the head with her laptop.
Tags:
redheadedfemme: (blog material--from <lj user="alt_icons")
Sunday when I went shopping (actually I had to waste a couple of hours while my computer was being worked on) I went into Barnes & Noble and indulged in my favorite pastime--roaming the aisles and buying books. One of those books included this title.




This wasn't the edition I bought, mostly because I couldn't stand the thought of owning the idiotic thing. See how strr--retttch--eddd out it looks, even in this picture? This is what I will call a Stupid Paperback. It's stupid because it's some misguided hybridization of a trade paperback and a mass market, standing at least an inch taller than the latter.

Now, I like trade paperbacks. They're a little more upscale, not quite as regal as Your Royal Highness the Queenly Hardback, nor as common as the mass market that sits and gulps its ale, pretending to speak in the clipped accent of its superiors. Trade paperbacks are like the heir born on the wrong side of the blanket who has an outside chance (if all his/her half siblings kick the bucket) of inheriting the title one day. They're friendly and genteel, and the only thing you have to watch with them is dog-earing the pages.

But stupid paperbacks? Bah. I glanced inside and was immediately disoriented by the longer pages. The rhythm of the typesetting seemed thrown off. This particular Stupid Paperback was pretty thick, and while I don't know exactly how many extra lines that works out to per page, it just made the book seem cumbersome and padded.

So I put it back and wandered into the Bargain section. Yes'm, I'm ashamed to say I haunt the remainder table. On this particular day, I found a hardback edition--make that a signed hardback edition--of the very same book, at a cheaper price than I would have paid for the Stupid Paperback!!

I don't know who on earth came up with the idea of publishing this book in such a format. I have all the previous V.I. Warshawski titles, but I would have passed on this one if I had not found the hardcover. Sara Paretsky ought to beat whoever approved this over the head with her laptop.
Tags:
redheadedfemme: (reading)
This thread, over at Twisty's, starts off with an incendiary provocation ("Heinlein is a fucking sexist knob") that evolves into a fascinating discussion of feminist sci/fi and fantasy. If I may, I'd like to add my two cents.

The Rising of the Moon, Flynn Connolly--I am ashamed of myself; I own this book and had forgotten all about it. Personally, I think this book is better than The Handmaid's Tale, which I barely managed to get through. It's a horrifying look at the lives women would lead under an Irish Catholic theocracy, as this excerpt shows.

"Oh, Maureen, no," came the soft reply. "You're not pregnant again?"

There was no answer; perhaps Maureen nodded.

"Christ! You've got eleven now! And the doctor said--"

"The doctor!" Maureen's voice dripped bitterness and disgust. "You know what his great medical advice was? To have Declan sleep in another room!" She lowered her voice even further, but Nuala heard it clearly. "He said my only choice was to refuse my husband. As if I could do that, even if I wanted to. You can't keep secrets from the devils in brown. If Father McRory heard that I wasn't sleeping with Declan, he'd send one of those blasted God Patrols round to threaten us. Excommunication, unemployment--Declan would never stand for either."

"But you've had three miscarriages already," her worried friend whispered. "What if--"

"Lucky for me the doctor testified on my behalf. If I have another, they might charge me with murder. What if they don't believe the doctor the next time?"

"You could go to Scotland--"

"If I had an abortion in Scotland, I could never come back. They'd know; they'd find out. And we can't all thirteen of us emigrate. There's no money." The woman's sigh was so wretched, so full of despair that Nuala winced. "God willing," Maureen went on, "I'll have this baby and no miscarriage. I don't know how we'll feed another one, but we will. And that's all there is to be done about it...Another baby. And Seamie still in nappies."


This book proves the truth of the saying: One man's (or woman's) terrorist is another's freedom fighter. Sadly, it's out of print, and there's no sequel as far as I know.

Gossamer Axe, Gael Baudino--This book is somewhat dated, as it was written during the 80's when heavy metal was in vogue. Now, I know who the author is talking about, but how many other readers will remember who Yngwie Malmsteen and Quiet Riot were?

Nevertheless, it's a terrific story, mixing the sidhe, the blues, and rock n' roll.

Daughter of the Lion and Sword-Born, Jennifer Roberson--Fantasy novels tackling fairly explicit feminist themes, especially the latter, featuring a hero who stopped, listened to his lover, and grew up. The former is not quite as worthy because it is marred by a horrible final line I was shocked the editor let remain.

Moon Called and Blood Bound, Patricia Briggs--Two new favorites, featuring a shapechanger mechanic heroine, werewolves, vampires, et cetera. No Anita Blake multifucking, at least so far. Although I find it interesting that most werewolves are portrayed as over-the-top dominating macho jerkwads. I suppose that has something to do with actual wolf behavior, but it gets tiresome. Also, the cover was more than a little sexist--what mechanic unzips his/her coverall to show off tattoos?--but I know the author has little control over that.

(Sorry, no Tiptree in my list, although "The Screwfly Solution" is one of the scariest stories I have ever read.)

See, there are feminist authors and feminist-themed sf/fantasy books to be found. You just gotta look for 'em.
redheadedfemme: (reading)
This thread, over at Twisty's, starts off with an incendiary provocation ("Heinlein is a fucking sexist knob") that evolves into a fascinating discussion of feminist sci/fi and fantasy. If I may, I'd like to add my two cents.

The Rising of the Moon, Flynn Connolly--I am ashamed of myself; I own this book and had forgotten all about it. Personally, I think this book is better than The Handmaid's Tale, which I barely managed to get through. It's a horrifying look at the lives women would lead under an Irish Catholic theocracy, as this excerpt shows.

"Oh, Maureen, no," came the soft reply. "You're not pregnant again?"

There was no answer; perhaps Maureen nodded.

"Christ! You've got eleven now! And the doctor said--"

"The doctor!" Maureen's voice dripped bitterness and disgust. "You know what his great medical advice was? To have Declan sleep in another room!" She lowered her voice even further, but Nuala heard it clearly. "He said my only choice was to refuse my husband. As if I could do that, even if I wanted to. You can't keep secrets from the devils in brown. If Father McRory heard that I wasn't sleeping with Declan, he'd send one of those blasted God Patrols round to threaten us. Excommunication, unemployment--Declan would never stand for either."

"But you've had three miscarriages already," her worried friend whispered. "What if--"

"Lucky for me the doctor testified on my behalf. If I have another, they might charge me with murder. What if they don't believe the doctor the next time?"

"You could go to Scotland--"

"If I had an abortion in Scotland, I could never come back. They'd know; they'd find out. And we can't all thirteen of us emigrate. There's no money." The woman's sigh was so wretched, so full of despair that Nuala winced. "God willing," Maureen went on, "I'll have this baby and no miscarriage. I don't know how we'll feed another one, but we will. And that's all there is to be done about it...Another baby. And Seamie still in nappies."


This book proves the truth of the saying: One man's (or woman's) terrorist is another's freedom fighter. Sadly, it's out of print, and there's no sequel as far as I know.

Gossamer Axe, Gael Baudino--This book is somewhat dated, as it was written during the 80's when heavy metal was in vogue. Now, I know who the author is talking about, but how many other readers will remember who Yngwie Malmsteen and Quiet Riot were?

Nevertheless, it's a terrific story, mixing the sidhe, the blues, and rock n' roll.

Daughter of the Lion and Sword-Born, Jennifer Roberson--Fantasy novels tackling fairly explicit feminist themes, especially the latter, featuring a hero who stopped, listened to his lover, and grew up. The former is not quite as worthy because it is marred by a horrible final line I was shocked the editor let remain.

Moon Called and Blood Bound, Patricia Briggs--Two new favorites, featuring a shapechanger mechanic heroine, werewolves, vampires, et cetera. No Anita Blake multifucking, at least so far. Although I find it interesting that most werewolves are portrayed as over-the-top dominating macho jerkwads. I suppose that has something to do with actual wolf behavior, but it gets tiresome. Also, the cover was more than a little sexist--what mechanic unzips his/her coverall to show off tattoos?--but I know the author has little control over that.

(Sorry, no Tiptree in my list, although "The Screwfly Solution" is one of the scariest stories I have ever read.)

See, there are feminist authors and feminist-themed sf/fantasy books to be found. You just gotta look for 'em.
redheadedfemme: (reading)
This is kind of interesting, although I don't know as much about Egyptian gods as I should. The only one I really paid much attention to was Bast.

Thoth
Indeed, you are 66% erudite, 33% sensual, 50% martial, and 33% saturnine.
Thoth, the Egyptian
God of secret wisdom, intellect, geometry and other forms of higher
mathematics, was also the God of books and learning, of writing and
numbers. And above all, he was the God of Magic. Indeed, he was the
first and greatest of all magicians, said to create miracles from
nothing by the mere vibrations of his voice alone.


Within his main temple were said to be stored his books of magic which
were open for the edification of all, providing those absorbing this
magic understood its sacred content. Over the centuries, these books
were said to have been carefully translated by various priests of
secret orders until finally, the Greeks compiled them as the works of Hermes Trismegistus.


One book most everyone is familiar with which is attributed to the mysteries of the God Thoth is the Tarot,
considered to be an unbound book of symbols that may be read in an
endless variety of sequences imitating the random nature of existence
itself.


The Fifteen Gods


These are the 15 categories of this test. If you score above average in …


…all or none of the four variables: Dagda. …
Erudite: Thoth. …
Sensual: Frey. …
Martial: Mars. …
Saturnine: Mictlantecuhtli. …

Erudite & Sensual: Amun. …
Erudite & Martial: Odin. …
Erudite & Saturnine: Anubis. …
Sensual & Martial: Zeus. …
Sensual & Saturnine: Cernunnos. …
Martial & Saturnine: Loki. …

Erudite, Sensual & Martial: Lug. …
Erudite, Sensual & Saturnine: Coyote. …
Erudite, Martial & Saturnine: Hades. …
Sensual, Martial & Saturnine: Pan.




My test tracked 4 variables How you compared to other people your age and gender:
free online datingfree online dating
You scored higher than 11% on erudite
free online datingfree online dating
You scored higher than 1% on sensual
free online datingfree online dating
You scored higher than 26% on martial
free online datingfree online dating
You scored higher than 8% on saturnine
Link: The Mythological God Test written by Nitsuki on Ok Cupid, home of the 32-Type Dating Test


No, I usually don't wander around finding memes and quizzes in lieu of something to say. I just thought this was intriguing. (Although the curator of Alexandria's library, even though he/she wasn't a god, would have been good too.)
Tags:
redheadedfemme: (reading)
This is kind of interesting, although I don't know as much about Egyptian gods as I should. The only one I really paid much attention to was Bast.

Thoth
Indeed, you are 66% erudite, 33% sensual, 50% martial, and 33% saturnine.
Thoth, the Egyptian
God of secret wisdom, intellect, geometry and other forms of higher
mathematics, was also the God of books and learning, of writing and
numbers. And above all, he was the God of Magic. Indeed, he was the
first and greatest of all magicians, said to create miracles from
nothing by the mere vibrations of his voice alone.


Within his main temple were said to be stored his books of magic which
were open for the edification of all, providing those absorbing this
magic understood its sacred content. Over the centuries, these books
were said to have been carefully translated by various priests of
secret orders until finally, the Greeks compiled them as the works of Hermes Trismegistus.


One book most everyone is familiar with which is attributed to the mysteries of the God Thoth is the Tarot,
considered to be an unbound book of symbols that may be read in an
endless variety of sequences imitating the random nature of existence
itself.


The Fifteen Gods


These are the 15 categories of this test. If you score above average in …


…all or none of the four variables: Dagda. …
Erudite: Thoth. …
Sensual: Frey. …
Martial: Mars. …
Saturnine: Mictlantecuhtli. …

Erudite & Sensual: Amun. …
Erudite & Martial: Odin. …
Erudite & Saturnine: Anubis. …
Sensual & Martial: Zeus. …
Sensual & Saturnine: Cernunnos. …
Martial & Saturnine: Loki. …

Erudite, Sensual & Martial: Lug. …
Erudite, Sensual & Saturnine: Coyote. …
Erudite, Martial & Saturnine: Hades. …
Sensual, Martial & Saturnine: Pan.




My test tracked 4 variables How you compared to other people your age and gender:
free online datingfree online dating
You scored higher than 11% on erudite
free online datingfree online dating
You scored higher than 1% on sensual
free online datingfree online dating
You scored higher than 26% on martial
free online datingfree online dating
You scored higher than 8% on saturnine
Link: The Mythological God Test written by Nitsuki on Ok Cupid, home of the 32-Type Dating Test


No, I usually don't wander around finding memes and quizzes in lieu of something to say. I just thought this was intriguing. (Although the curator of Alexandria's library, even though he/she wasn't a god, would have been good too.)
Tags:

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Of course I am not worried about intimidating men. The type of man who will be intimidated by me is exactly the type of man I have no interest in. ~Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

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A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. The man who never reads lives only one. ~George R.R. Martin

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